bee-003I’m sure you’ve heard about how the bee population is declining – but why? And what does it mean for our food supply as humans? The answers are all in this infographic and article about Colony Collapse Disorder by CustomMade. The truth is – it is a dire situation and we need to do our best to keep bees going.

This graphic from the article really struck home for me – 1/3 of our food supply is linked to pollination!

So what can you do? Here are some tips from the article:

  • Grow a garden. Whether you have a giant yard or just a small porch or windowsill on which to plant a few flowers, growing a diversity of plants that are attractive to bees (such as Russian sage and germander) can provide important pollen and nectar sources. Do not use plants that have been treated with insecticides, and keep your garden insecticide- and pesticide- free.
  • Let weeds be. Instead of eradicating all the weeds from your lawn, recognize that they’re more than an eyesore. Dandelions and clover, in particular, are two of bees’ favorite foods. So let weeds grow free (and be sure not to spray them with pesticides).
  • Ditch the chemicals. Make your yard, garden, and home a commercial pesticide-, herbicide-, and fertilizer-free zone.
  • Support pesticide-free food. Purchase pesticide-free produce at the grocery store and farmers’ markets so that you’re supporting crops that are grown in a way that is helpful, and not harmful, to bees.
  • Speak up. Sign petitions to ban the use of neonics and other harmful pesticides, and write to your representatives to express your support for finding a solution to CCD.
  • Become a beekeeper. Learn how to keep a beehive on your own property. Small hives add diversity to local bee pollinations. Bonus: If you also keep a garden, your bees pollinate it for you!

Click to Enlarge Image

Beyond the Bees’ Knees – How Colony Collapse Disorder affects our food supply

Beyond the Bees’ Knees – How Colony Collapse Disorder affects our food supply
Infographic by CustomMade

How will you help save the bees?